Big News! The Small Screen is not Shrinking

Despite conflicting opinions and research, millennials continue to watch a lot of Television. Yes, TV viewership among young adults has lessened over time…but the decrease isn’t significant enough to warrant widespread panic. There’s also no need to compete for advertising dollars, thanks to a new technology that syncs the two screen consumer experience.

But first things first.

According to Deloitte, in March, 2013, 54 percent of leading millennials watched TV on any device.

During the last quarter of 2013, Nielsen reports that TV viewership among young adults isn’t fluctuating as much as people think. (Source: MarketingCharts)

“Nielsen’s most recent study indicates that Americans aged 18-24 watched a weekly average of about 22.5 hours during Q4 2013. That was a 47-minute drop-off from Q4 2012, which in turn had been down more than 2 hours from the year before.”

Other highlights from MarketingCharts reveal:

  • In the space of two years, Q4 TV viewing by 18-24-year-olds dropped by three hours per week
  • Most of that decline came between 2011 and 2012
  • The decline in viewing between Q4 2012 and Q4 2013 amounted to less than 7 minutes per day
  • Percentagewise, traditional TV viewing among 18-24-year-olds in Q4 2013 dropped by only 3.9 percent year-over-year

Clearly, Nielsen has a vested interest in TV viewership numbers, so we must seek balanced and fair research from numerous and non-biased sources.

Stop Fighting for Ad Dollars

How can the chase for billions of TV advertising dollars come to an end?

Andy Nobbs is CMO at Civolution, a technology provider that manages and monetizes media content. He writes on TheGuardian.com that syncing the consumer experience with automatic content response technology can benefit both TV and digital.

“ACR technology and content triggering allow applications running on second screen devices to automatically recognize the content being played on the television screen and synchronize the displaying of a digital ad unit in real time. So the man in the city who wants to drive the exotic car can locate the nearest dealer and even schedule a test drive right at the moment of piqued interest – just as the TV ad has been viewed. The marketer doesn’t have to go through the costly process of re-locating this potential buyer on the internet—and the potential buyer doesn’t have to “remember” that empowering feeling of theoretically rocketing the sports car through the doldrums of the daily commute. What applies to the sports car can also apply to everyday consumables as well – anything from a pizza meal to video-on-demand.”

Nobbs goes on to explain that everyone can win because advertisers and brands ensure their content is seen rather than skipped, content providers can sell ads more effectively and appropriately, and viewers can move that much more quickly to act on that stirring instilled emotion: aspiration.

I have to agree with Nobbs when he says Television can make people take action unlike any other medium.

There’s no small screen shrinkage here.

5 Essential Branding Questions About Google and comScore’s New Partnership

life in the cracksScore one for instant gratification in the measurement of digital advertising. Google has announced an agreement with global ad metrics firm, comScore.

The plan:  Google will integrate comScore’s measurement platform, Validated Campaign Essentials (vCE), into its DoubleClick ad business.

The anticipated result: Google corners the market on big brand advertising by providing instant tracking of online campaigns and consumer behavior. If a marketing initiative isn’t performing as companies had anticipated, quick changes can be made to improve results. Industry execs won’t be waiting 24 hours to receive analytics; the data can be available within minutes or hours.

The integration of vCE will allow Google to drill deep into the segmentation of digital consumers’ habits, preferences, and behaviors. vCE promises agility to brands watching from the sidelines.

In theory, Google hopes to woo advertisers who spend billions of dollars a year on TV out of traditional media and onto the Internet.

Isn’t the web the place where instant gratification is magnified in real time?

But as brands, advertisers, media companies, and tech firms continuously create this trajectory of opportunity that brings immense power, I have to wonder:

  • How are consumers reacting to this news? (Let’s not forget consumers can make or break a brand)
  • In the wake of security breaches and hacking, will a stepped-up level of online monitoring leave a bad taste in the mouths of online shoppers?
  • Are  powerhouse companies like Google considered too ‘sneaky’ for their own good?
  • Will lawmakers try to legislate this piece of our industry?
  • What role, if any, will comScore’s rival Nielsen play in the transformation of TV advertising?

Executives from both Google and comScore say that for now, the multiyear agreement covers display ads and advertising on video and mobile devices. It will likely also extend to future ad products, technology and platforms that Google may develop.

As the advertising and branding landscape transforms at warp speed, we’ll continue to watch the measurement side closely.

The colossal impact that new measurement tools can have on potentially billions of online ads each day brings us into uncharted waters.

Are brands prepared to manage the convergence of instant gratification, agility, and sneaky? Is it even possible?

Brands Shift into Online Video at Record Speed

In our media planning and buying practice, the biggest shift we have seen by advertisers in the past year is to online video. Our brand clients have embraced online video and we have seen tremendous success with driving traffic and growing engagement through digital video media buys. Big and small TV advertisers have been shifting a portion of media budgets to online video.

Brands who cannot afford TV are now producing video and buying across the web in a very targeted manner. The results we see are unlike anything we’ve seen previously online in terms of engagement and click rates.

Digital research firm eMarketer says video is the fastest growing form of digital advertising, with spending increasing 46% last year and outpacing search ads and display ads.  eMarketer estimates digital video will be a $4.14 Billion industry this year, doubling the 2011 numbers.

March 2013 comScore online video numbers are impressive, as well:

Consumers watched 39 billion online videos in March 2013, according to a new report by comScore.

  • Ads accounted for over 25 percent of all videos viewed.
  • 84.5% of the U.S. population viewed Video in March.
  • 52% of the U.S. population saw a video ad in March.
  • The average number of video ads per consumer was 82x

Nothing seems to be able to stop the rise of TV as the dominant form of media by advertisers (it is estimated to be a $66.35 Billion industry this year) but online video is growing and gaining a lot of interest and ad dollars from national advertisers. As media buyers prepare to enter the annual television upfront marketplace, digital video has found a respected place among advertisers.